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Are you a racer or a gamer

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by GregoryLeo, Jun 12, 2021.

  1. GregoryLeo

    GregoryLeo Well-Known Member

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    I was watching a Trans Am race the other day, and Adam Andretti was working in the commentators box. One of the racing teams was having a miserable time of it in the race, everything possible was going wrong but they still kept going. So during all of this Adam makes a comment that really stuck in my head. "Everybody has days on the track like this. And I have a lot of respect for the teams that just fight through them. If you haven't had a really bad race day that you had to fight through, then you haven't been racing long enough."

    That comment made me stop and review my my own sim racing habits. Now I know many of you would consider me to be a gamer by default because I only race in single player mode. But so what, I sim race for fun and multi-player racing stress's me out, it's not fun. So anyway I got to thinking about what I do when things start to go horribly wrong. And yah a lot of the time I bail, more than I liked to admit to myself. Guess what Gregory, your a gamer.o_O

    Having faced that realization, I decided to tackle it head on. And you know what? My race craft got better, there's something about knuckling down, grit you teeth, focus and push through the worst moments on the track.:cool: I found myself smiling after sitting back and thinking FU#K that was brutal, but made it to the end of the race, YES!:) Heck That was almost fun.

    So I put the question out to there for you to think about, especially the online racers. Do you quit because the back marker just passed you? Or if someone punts you off the track for what ever reason? Or you just can't seem to get it together that day? Because if you do, you might be a gamer.

    Just something to consider within yourself.
    Have fun out there,
    Gregoryleo
     
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  2. FormelLMS

    FormelLMS Well-Known Member

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    ESC ist never an Option to me
     
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  3. Ablaze

    Ablaze Well-Known Member

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    Very good point Gregory. I came to the same conclusion after I started karting in real life. Before that I mostly quitted the race in games/sims if something gone wrong because I had nothing to gain anymore at that point. Now i see it with different eyes.

    Even if all goes wrong in a kart season, you'd paid for that season so you should make most out of it. Otherwise it would be wasted money and time. There's always the possiblity to improve your personal best lap time even if you're running dead last. Or look on the driving lines and braking points of better drivers to learn something new. So I changed my mindset and never give up. Each race is an oportunity to hone your skills and racecraft.

    That helped me a lot in simracing too. :)
     
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  4. Bull Shark

    Bull Shark Well-Known Member

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    Nice read. I myself will always complete the race. No matter what happens. Start on p1 and somewhere in the race I get knocked of the track, I start at the end of the grid but try to work my way back to the front of the grid..
     
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  5. Nico Kunze

    Nico Kunze Well-Known Member

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    In multiplayer ill usually keep going as long as the car is somewhat driveable damage wise. In single player races where i make a mistake or the ai punts me and i end up a good bit behind the field ill either restart the race if it happened in the first few laps or ill just quit and drive something else. Main reason being that if i start a single player race then i want to actually race against other cars, if i want to drive around on my own i can do that without ai costing me precious fps :D and chances are i only chose a certain combo because thats what i wanted to race, not neccessarily what i wanted to drive, so if i end up just driving then theres probably a combo id enjoy more at that moment and at the end of the day enjoying it is what its all about for me. Guess that might make me a gamer although i typically wouldnt consider myself one because i have no interest in video games but whatever :D
     
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  6. Maskerader

    Maskerader Well-Known Member

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    Well said! A lot of food for thought.

    I remember I watched Billy Strange's single player races and was very surprised when he said he never restarts, even if he crashes/spins out on the first lap. Although I always do my best to complete a race in one shot, I do sometimes restart, so I thought - eh, why not restarting if it's only a few corners? Now, after reading the opening post, I realise where he's coming from and it makes a lof of sense, even if it's not a familiar "gamer" sense.

    I never bail out of a multiplayer race though, even if I fail miserably. To me this is something very different than restarting a single player race...

    P.S.
    So something like that, yep. :D
     
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    Last edited: Jun 12, 2021
  7. SunnySunday

    SunnySunday Well-Known Member

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    In singplayer I restart if first lap goes to shit :D In MP it depends on mood, setting of race etc. I used to race in a league and then I would always finish the race no matter what position I was in. But yeah more casual "gaming" I typically give up if it goes to hell :p
     
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  8. Danny Michael

    Danny Michael Member

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    I quit racing people for the most part and prefer to do hotlaps and leaderboard challenges. I still race single player, but multiplayer with people who insist the race is won at T1 have ruined it for me. Putting in the work to practice and qualify, and then be punted, not fun. The consequences to the punter are zero as they continue on and I'm in the wall. ESC
     
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  9. PPTR

    PPTR Member

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    Online races I always continue, even in games that damage may force you to pit to repair the car to be driveable and you are a lap or two down.
    Offline races I rarely qualify but start at the rear or at best midfield. That is the reason I prefer a game with decent AI but usually most times even then if the AI spins me which does happen if the Aggression level is set high and you push the limits a bit hard I will continue.
    The goal is to race hard and clean not having any contact and setting the AI up for clean overtakes and gain as many positions as possible. Actual finishing position in those offline races really does not matter if I make as few mistakes as possible.
     
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  10. GregoryLeo

    GregoryLeo Well-Known Member

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    Yah, when I first got into sim racing about 8 years ago, one of the first things I did was join a couple of leagues. And between the prima donnas who would bitch and moan if you got in their way, and the jerks who would run you off the road out of spite, it really soured the online experience for me. But the kicker came for me when, as I started to improve my race craft and I started passing people, they would quit. So now I'm happy to race in single player mode. There's no drama, and if I make a mistake and accidentally ass end one them they don't get all pissy with me. It's a lot more fun for me and I don't have to rearrange my life to race them.
     
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  11. Turtle Power

    Turtle Power Well-Known Member

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    I am more of an enthusiasts. I enjoy simulations-immersion factor. Driving ETS2, ATS, racing RR and iR for fun and joy. Not interested in competition but i do like online racing mainly for having a good time.
     
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  12. yoori

    yoori Well-Known Member

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    I'm a racer in multiplayer and a gamer in single player.
    When single player I always over drive the car, because I want to get the best time or place and end up in a barrier.
    I reset and do it again. That's why I don't do single player unless it's to learn breaking points on a new track.

    In multi / ranked I drive to get the best result and gain rep/rat if it's in ranked. I would only leave if I'm a danger to others. (I once started a race after a very hard day and wasn't able to keep it on track).
    There's always something to gain in multiplayer, even if you're hit in t1, have to go to pits for repairs and end up a lap or two behind. The's always a chance someone has a worse race. Plus that's always some practice.
     
  13. VFX Pro

    VFX Pro Member

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    The new ranked servers have definitely reduced the "win at turn 1" racers...
     
  14. PPTR

    PPTR Member

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    I feel the same way even in offline races, as I feel the learning potential is there every time I get on the track.
    Actually sometimes I think as far as setting up other cars to make a quick clean overtake I actually learn more offline to be better and more efficient online as the AI will usually race you clean and in many cases be very defensive of their track position.
    Online in the mid tier splits I would be racing in there are to many drivers that use contact and dirty blocking tactics to hold the position rather than having the knowledge and race craft that such stupidity and moves early to mid race only hurt you both by slowing you down and increasing the gap to the next group of racers you are trailing actually cementing a lower probable position finish.
    So even offline learning and practicing a better and quicker technique to make a quick clean pass on another car and using alternate to the desired premium race lines to do it so you are basically clear and have completed the move before they even realize it is coming is a big plus and a skill that is great regardless of where you race but can really have the largest rewards when dealing with online human opponents.
    For 99.8% of all sim racers there is always new things to learn and more practice and track time regardless of offline or online has the potential to improve your skills.
     
  15. Bull Shark

    Bull Shark Well-Known Member

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    To answering your question on the opening post, I’m a race-gamer, does this counts as well.:D
     
  16. Ricardo Soares

    Ricardo Soares Member

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    I consider myself as both, despite not have raced in real life.

    That said, I usually race until the end of any session, except when the car gets wrecked to the point I can't race.

    Regards.

    Ricardo V. Soares
     
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  17. Steve Redfox

    Steve Redfox New Member

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    I have been into real life rally driving for three years in my early days. Typical event duration...several hours to 2 full days. Aside from any interuptions due to technical problems or one a non-repairable damage, giving up was never a option.
    1. You paid quite some money for preparation and of course starting fee...and you want something back for it.
    2. All results were counted for several annual championships, like the one in the Motorsportclub you were driving for, the car class on regional and national level and so on.
    3. EACH timed stint counted unless points were erased due to unsporty or unfair behavior. That included proper preparation of the car ( or lack of it ) according the event's rules and regulations.
    4. If you did not reach a certain level of performance during the rally year, you could not register for certain events in the running and upcoming season. You could even loose your sportsdriver licence.
    Aside from all above, the thrill and atmosphere during a rally weekend or test-drives is something I never wanted to miss.
    Bailing out was anyway no option as it was considered as unsporty and unfair vs. other teams who staid put despite facing similar difficulties...
    In a nutshell, dropping outvwas simply no option and nobody thought about it in any seriousness.

    I took the freedom to check how real life racing is today in this respect. I think some well known F1 drivers have the worst habbit...if something went wrong and they had to bail out, quite a few took their plane or Heli and left the place of misery as quickly as possible. Leaving their teams to clean up the rest....Others stayed put and watched/ supported their teammate and the team until the end of the race.

    And those dropouts are fairly common, especially in longer endurance races. Example 24h of Spa 2020:
    Out of 56 cars , each manned with three drivers, all Pro's, only 7 (!) managed to race the full distance.
    Results ftom 24h NordS look somewhat similar.

    I have not checked the shorter sprint races yet, but typically, at least for the GT, DTM and WTCC/WTCR classes, you would not find many racers simply dropping off if things go sour. Most of them, especially the privateers, are racers inside out and hence they behave like that.

    In Simracing, aside from all the public and ranked server hassles, many races take only a fraction of the time of a real race.
    On a click of my mouse, I can simply restart, take another race of 20 minutes or decide to turn in for a couple practice laps on a new track, thousands of miles away from the last one all within less then a minute....these options make it easy to forget any hardship and venture on to....the next dropout...

    For most people in sim-racing , who are not also real life racedrivers ( amateur or pro ) one important aspect is completely missing: the literally physical connection to the race car.

    In real life and as an amateur, it's often your own money standing on 4 wheels waiting for your input to ride it out, take care of it, have a team look for you etc. You have expectations from the cars performance, you spent countless hours thinking how to improve certain aspects. In short, this piece of metals, rubber and plastic lives. It has a character and becomes a friend or an enemy....This "mental" connection does not exist in simracing..to clicks on the mouse and even the worst damages are repaired....even realmode, you don't feel the hurt when you look at a virtual wreck. If you have ever seen tough men crying like babies in front of their destroyed race/rally car, you know what I mean.

    Don't get me wrong. Accidents and costly mistakes / decisions belong to racing like tires on the road. Every racer knows that and takes the risk. After all, it's a sport carried out at the edges of physics...like flying a fighter jet and not very much runs according to plan....

    However, the mental impact of a real crash , aside from any personal injuries, on a drivers mentality and the effects of the " communication with the team" afterwards form a drivers character over time.
    There is absolutely nothing in Sim-racing which would allow for this kind of "education" and prepare a sim racer for the mental ups and downs related to a real racing carrier, be it as a pro or a privateer.

    Long story short : the incentive behaving like a real racer in sim-racing is very limited.
    Loosing reputation is a first, but somewhat weak try to keep the moral up.

    Most people prefer anyway the quickest and easiest routes in life today and hence no big difference in gaming/ sim racing. I do not expect a majority of sim racers behaving like real racers in the first place. It would be unrealistic. And yes, I do, with 62 years, enjoy the freedom a sim offers in terms of racing many different cars on many different tracks in short period of time. On the track, I try to behave like a sportsman und not like a childish boy. However, if a race is over for me due to accidents, mistakes or beeing divebombed by the AI, which happens not very frequently, I tend to take the freedom to end or re-start a race in singleplayer.

    That said, let's try to keep racecraft and sportsmanship up as much as possible.

    Regards Stefan
     
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    Last edited: Jun 20, 2021