Preview DTM physics test with Bruno Spengler - LIVE today 18:00 CEST

Discussion in 'News & Announcements' started by Sector3, Oct 24, 2016.

  1. Tobias Schröder

    Tobias Schröder Well-Known Member

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    Nice :cool:
     
  2. Skybird

    Skybird Well-Known Member

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    I am lookig forward to the more vivid car behavior and alive physics. While I like RR physics all in all, they seem to imply generally more grip and in-.build stability than other race titles. A bit more "(fr)agility" I would not mind to try out.

    Somewhere in the past 7-10 days it was said that the kerbs also get some more teeth again. I remember that I complained about the kerbs being meaningless when the Nordschleife was released, and in a later build they then had added more "angriness" to some of them on the Nordschleife. That was a step into the right direction, but I still think that some of the steeper kerbs there still are too forgiving. Some of these really should feel as if a giant kicks against your wheel when rolling over them, pushing your tail back to the centreline of the track and unsettling the car. In AC I have learned which kerbs I could use and which not, its the same like in reality: there you can use some kerbs and you are best advised to stay away from some others. I would like to see RR reaching there more closely. So any improvement on the kerbs is welcomed.
     
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  3. LTC Mike

    LTC Mike Active Member

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    well, if this would mean better (=more real) "tire and driving (plus environmental) physics" I would appreciate that, too, if it would mean to become just more "slippery" (as a lot of so called sim racers seem to feel confident that race cars have to be slippery to drive right...) I don't want to see this kind of ice-racing feature (or you could call it "AC cold tire slippery driving physics", too ) in R3E. If one looks at other sims like rFactor2 or Automobilista there is some kind of tire behaviour that transports environmental factors plus rubber physics, drivechain and gear mechanics very well so you could even drive with cold tires very well and have to manage these without using artificial slippery effects to simulate some kind of racing difficulty real race cars - even modern ones - normally don't have - until you get over the border...
     
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  4. Skybird

    Skybird Well-Known Member

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    I absolutely agree that "difficulty" does not automatically mean "realism". But lacking grip of the rubber and slippery car behaviour obviously are somewhat linked. How else would you translate the effects of cold or hopelessly run down tyres into car behaviour the sim driver can feel and experience?

    Longer braking distances of course also are to be included. And probably some more. But in principle I do not know how to describe a car of lacking grip as not being more "slippery". In the end, grip comes from two factors: downforce (aertodynamics), and friction (rubber-tarmac-contact). The one can compensate for loss of the other only to some degree, and not further.
     
  5. LTC Mike

    LTC Mike Active Member

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    You are pretty right: tire degradation, flat spots, cold tarmac conditions, etc. should have an influence how a tire behaves. The better this would be simulated the better we get an experience how "real" racing cars drive and should be driven. More factors are tire flexibility, sidewall stability, grip loss and regain in certain driving situations ...
    But: most times I had those kind of discussion with "some kind of hardcore sim racers" I learned that a race car has to be slippery and a sports or "normal" streets car has to be more slippery, just to create or to transport the difficulty of fast driving. In the end the driving physics in a lot of the more modern racing simulators are often changed to please those hardcore communities that find the difference between them as "pro (sim) racing" and the normal/casual sim driver in the abilities to manage these over and artificial slippery cars with your average sim driving equipment.
    And even if maybe the physics calculations are correct to the last bit that those slippery behaviour is based on, this ignores that we (normally) get our informations just through a 2D display and a gaming wheel. All those real life factors are missing, like sitting tight connected in a racing car, hearing every rumble, feeling every bump and minimum slip effects through your back, smelling overstressed brakes etc.So in my opinion a "normal" PC (console) simulation has to respect these factors and reduce real world effects to a level that could be adressed through our equipment - else you can loose all the fun and immersion quite fast and that means you'll loose your users base... but on the last sign before the lights are switched off, one can read: we had the most real physics simulations - sadly no one could feel it right through its mediocre plastic devices ;)
     
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    Last edited: Nov 2, 2016
  6. fl0wf1r3

    fl0wf1r3 Well-Known Member

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    did Bruno used the default profile for his wheel? I am just wondering if tweaking the ffb makes sense. Objective wise
     
  7. J-F Chardon

    J-F Chardon Sector3 Producer Developer

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    Yes, he had a G27 with default profile.
     
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  8. fl0wf1r3

    fl0wf1r3 Well-Known Member

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    cool, thx