News Physics Update: Tyres, force feedback, AI and general developments

Discussion in 'News & Announcements' started by Alex Hodgkinson, Dec 10, 2019.

  1. Alex Hodgkinson

    Alex Hodgkinson Sector3 Developer

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    Tyres
    Always a hot topic in sim racing, let's start here. It's true the basis of our tyre model can trace it's routes back a year or two, but that absolutely does not mean that it's been standing still. Like every aspect of RaceRoom it's undergone constant development, tweaks and improvements. Firstly we've made absolutely sure that every element of the tyre model is working as it should be and did find some errors to fix. Over the last two and a half years everything has been fully documented for reference, with several aspects earmarked for future improvements, and here we are with some of those now.
    Before anything else it's important to mention that the car's dash display tyre temps show the hottest part of the tyre.

    Flat spots
    You asked for it, we delivered; now locking up can cause a tyre to flat spot. You'll feel a slight vibration at first. If you keep locking up, you can have several lock up "flats" on one tyre - like a British 50p coin. Vibrations will get pretty bad at that point. Once you've locked up once, it becomes more likely that the flat spot will happen at that same point of the tread, and if you lock up enough the tyre will wear through and puncture. Remember a lot of our cars do have ABS though, so chances are you won't be locking up too often

    Camber
    Thanks to a big effort by new recruit @Thomas Jansen and @Robert Holm we have an entirely new section of code for camber behaviour. Previously, more was always better, but from this update there's a lot more going off here. Due to an effect called side-thrust, tyres will make better lateral grip with higher camber angles. How much camber you need to run to make use of this is directly dependant on weight transfer. The more weight transferred to the outside of the tyre, the more camber the tyre will need. This is why you see heavier GT, Touring and Cup cars running higher camber angles than lightweight prototypes.
    The trade off is that excessive camber angles will increase tyre heating at the inside part of the tyre as the sidewall is being worked hard. Also increased wear as the inside edge of the tyre is doing a lot of the workload.

    Pneumatic trail
    This is all about simulating the flex of the tyre contact patch. When viewed from above, the tyre contact patch moves around relative to the centre of the tyre as a car is subject to various forces. As a tyre is squashed in to the ground by weight transfer while cornering, the centre of the contact patch is pushed rearwards and inwards or outwards. This creates something called self aligning torque and is a phenomena which was totally omitted from RaceRoom until this update. Self aligning torque will work to pull the wheels straight during heavy braking, and will reduce as grip reduces too. What this all means is that the steering wheel will communicate more information to the driver than ever before.

    Force Feedback
    We made the force feedback profiles we use the new defaults.
    We heard a feedback from Direct Drive users that default settings weren't satisfactory, so rectifying that became high priority. Lechner Racing and Andre Rajkovic were kind enough to invite us to Switzerland on a development field trip, from which we returned with a lot of homework to do.
    There are a lot of changes behind the scenes, including the pneumatic trail above so we recommend that you start afresh with one of our shiny new profiles. If you wish to tailor a car's steering strength to your liking use the FFB multiplier in the car setup screen.
    On the controller, we recommend that Thrustmaster and Logitech make no changes in windows from the default settings.
    Fanatec CSW users, the drift setting should be set to -1. With DD1 and DD2 bases, reducing the natural damper value can bring out some details and remove a slight overdamped feeling.

    More details on setting up FFB setting here

    Damage
    You'll notice now that visual damage is now a thing. Small brushes with a wall will scrape your paintwork or maybe knock off a mirror. Now huge collisions will dent roofs, knock off wings, bonnets, and render the car undriveable. There's more than that though, before bits start falling off. Curb abuse or off-track excursions can bend suspension components and leave you with off-centre steering or a few minutes of extra camber. Maybe even some more toe in or a wobbling wheel. It's not necessarily the end of your race though as suspension damage can usually be repaired. It may take several minutes however.

    Suspension
    Our suspension model has been at the centre of all developments for the last couple of years now. Gaining a thorough understanding of how real suspension systems work and how to implement them properly within our framework has been of upmost importance. What we have now is a system in which we can input measurements from real cars and it'll tell us all the essentials. Roll centre heights, camber behaviour, anti-dive, anti-squat, and so on. It can then turn all of those numbers into something we can put straight into R3E. No guesswork there.
    If we don't have any real measurements the system can allow us to design an entire suspension system from scratch. If you wanted to build your own race car, this is exactly what you'd want.
    As a KW-owned company it was only a matter of time before we became damper obsessed. It started to become apparent that out methods for damper tuning weren't providing optimal results. One damper tuning book later, and some discussions with KW engineers set us on the right path. Now we have an efficient system for tuning dampers. You'll find that the cars tuned by this method are more compliant in transient situations. For example, a badly setup damper can lead to excessive locking up, or sudden snap-back oversteer.
    I can recommend third party apps Second Monitor and Racing Sim Tools if you'd like to study how we've gone about setting up dampers, and get stuck into doing damper tuning of your own. Bilster-Berg is particularly useful for that as it has so many elevation changes, but remember that the results you see will be asymmetrical as there are far more left hand turns than right.
    We also added third spring options to the garage setup screen. Hold tight, more cars in the future will make use of this.

    Artificial intellegence
    Thanks to @Robert Holm I got an entirely new system for tuning AI behaviour with a lot more control. I've read some presumptions about what AI physics are like, so I'll set that clear here. In the very latest cars, AI physics files are extremely close to the players, with only minimal changes to anti-roll bar and wing angles in order to suit the AI better. The differences between player & AI come with a simplified AI tyre model, and the way that the AI interpret physics parameters. Both of these these things are necessary to optimise CPU usage.
    What we can do now is control how quickly the AI attempt to take various corner types, how hard to brake and how much harder they need to brake when following another car to avoid rear-ending. All this means that AI brake performance matches yours, they are better in the tighter turns, won't drive away from you through fast sweepers and are generally better to race against.

    ABS & Traction Control
    @Thomas Jansen spent a good deal of time on getting to the bottom of why our traction control, and to a lesser extent, ABS, only served to slow lap times down. What he's come up with is far and above anything we could offer with any previous car sets. You'll find that traction control is now much less intrusive, the cut comes in more progressively and the TC positions can be used to tune how much slip angle the car holds when you're on the throttle. Personally I find somewhere around default setting 4 to my liking with most cars.
    Contrary to popular belief, the main purpose of ABS is to enable a car to turn while braking; it's not about reducing braking distances. The improvements here, also down to Thomas, are similar to those of traction control, and enable more effective use of brakes to aid corner entry.
    These ABS & TC changes have so far only been rolled out to the cars we updated today, it's not a global change.


     
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    Last edited: Dec 12, 2019
  2. Alex Hodgkinson

    Alex Hodgkinson Sector3 Developer

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    Underneath is the first, unchopped version of the tooltip text found in the garage menus. The content is generally the same, but this version is wordier and contains a few extra snippets of information some of you may find useful:


    BrakeBias

    Used to maximise braking efficiency, this describes how much pressure is applied to the front verses the rear braking system. Deceleration peaks as tyres are close to locking up, so this adjustment is used to ensure front and rear braking systems are being used efficiently. As weight transfers forward during braking, it’s usual to apply more braking force to the front wheels than the rears, which are in turn unloaded.
    Increase front bias if the rear of the car is unstable, suddenly spins or rear tyres lock when braking or at turn entry. Reduce front bias when front tyres lock up during braking zones and corner entries.

    BrakePressure
    Increases or decreases total braking power. Useful when desired braking behaviour cannot be attained through adjusting brake bias. Reducing the brake pressure by a few percent can help to reduce locking up, but the trade-off is less overall brake power.

    FuelQuantity
    How many litres of fuel to fill the fuel tank for the next sortie. Each litre adds around 0.75kg to the car, and fuel tank is rarely placed at the car’s centre of gravity. Therefore adding fuel may have a considerable effect on the balance of the car. Ensure to test your car out with a full fuel load before race time to avoid any unexpected balance issues.

    TyreCompound
    Compound refers to the makeup of the rubber the tyre tread is made from. Softer compounds will give more grip and faster lap times whereas harder compounds are more durable. In contemporary race series the tyre compound is often a controlled item specified by organisers.

    SteeringLock
    Describes the how many degrees the front wheels can turn in each direction at full lock. This is set to match the real car’s range by default. Decreasing this value means the front wheels will steer more slowly for a given steering input, whereas increasing will speed up how fast the front wheels steer. Greater angle will allow you to negotiate tight turns more easily, but can make it easier to over-react to slides.

    SteeringAngle
    The total rotation range of the steering wheel from full left to full right and vice versa. This is set to match the real car’s steering range by default. Increasing this value means the front wheels will steer more slowly for a given steering input while decreasing will speed up how fast the front wheels steer. Faster steering will allow you to negotiate tight turns more easily, but can make it easier to over-react to slides.

    FFBMultiplier
    Individual force feedback multiplier for each car. Increase if the steering forces are not strong enough, decrease if they are too strong.

    AntiRollBarFront
    AntiRollBarRear

    Also known as sway bars, these are transversely mounted springs used primarily to tune a car’s balance and resist body roll during cornering. They also play an important part in controlling camber during corners and are used to manage tyre loads. Changes here may necessitate adjustments to camber and tyre pressures.
    Increasing the anti-roll bar stiffness at one end of the car will mean more load is transferred to the outside tyre at that end. This will result in a more responsive axle, but with ultimately less grip, although it may also become more stable.
    Softer anti-roll bars will make for a more compliant suspension, which will also perform better over uneven surfaces such as curbs and will be easier to drive, at the cost of responsiveness.
    It’s possible to disconnect the anti-roll bar in some cases in order to gain even more compliance.

    ToeInFront
    ToeInRear

    Toe describes where the front of the tyre is pointing relative to the rear when viewed above. Toe-in is when the front of the tyre is pointing towards the centreline of the car. In RaceRoom we may use both positive and negative values here. When negative, the front of the tyre is pointing away from the centreline of the car, which is also known as toe-out. Changes here are mostly felt when driving on straights, and when entering turns. Therefore it’s usual to have a small amount of toe out at the front, to aid turn-in and a small amount of toe in on the rear to aid straight-line stability.
    Toe-out will produce corner-entry oversteer and reduce straight line stability, whereas toe-in will do the opposite and increase turn-in understeer and increase stability.

    Front Downforce
    Aerodynamic devices add loads which push the car into the track and increase with speed. Downforce has the added bonus of not adding weight to the car, so it does not slow acceleration. However the drawback is increased aerodynamic drag which will limit top speed.
    Splitters, wings, airdams, diffusers and drive planes are all methods of front downforce generation. Increasing the value here will add both downforce and drag to the front of the vehicle. It is normal for a majority of a car’s downforce to be balanced towards the rear of the car and use the front downforce devices to trim the balance.
    Increase if the front of the car becomes lighter, less responsive and harder to turn as speed increases.
    Decrease if the front of the car becomes unstable and hard to control at high speed.

    SpringsFrontLeft
    SpringsFrontRight
    SpringsRearLeft
    SpringsRearRight

    Springs control how much the suspension is able to move and are used to optimise the tyres contact with the road surface. The lower the spring rate, the more the car will move in pitch, roll and heave when accelerating, braking, negotiating corners and when subjected to aerodynamic forces. If too soft, the body will roll and pitch excessively, make poor use of it’s tyres and may scrape the ground. When too stiff, the car will become unstable over uneven surfaces, hard to drive, and will overheat it’s tyres.
    Softer springs are needed if the car is overly responsive, overheating it’s tyres and is difficult over uneven surfaces.
    Stiffer springs are needed if the car is unresponsive, hard to keep heat in tyres, requires excessive camber to give desired handling and is bottoming out.

    NB: This refers to the rate of the actual spring in it’s mounted location, which is then subject to a motion ratio. Therefore it is meaningless to compare spring rates between cars.

    TyrePressureFrontLeft
    TyrePressureFrontRight
    TyrePressureRearLeft
    TyrePressureRearRight

    It’s best to use the tyre info section at the bottom left side of the setup screen to help tune tyre pressures, comparing the inside, middle and outside temperatures.
    Increasing pressures will cause the tyre tread profile to shape into a dome and make the centre of the tyre run hotter. Decreasing pressures will increase temperatures at the sides of the tyre as the sidewalls take more of the load.
    Aim to match the middle temperature to the average of the inside and outside of the tyre so that the tyres are being used most effectively.

    RideHeightFrontLeft
    RideHeightFrontRight

    Changes the height above ground of the lowest point of the car between the front wheels.
    Making adjustments here can affect aerodynamics, weight distribution and suspension behaviour. In modern classes a minimum ride height is often stipulated by Balance Of Performance.
    In cars with aerodynamic devices, lowering the front can give more front downforce as it will benefit the ground effects. However, going too low can cause them to ground out and lose most of their downforce.
    Lowering the front will also help to move weight distribution towards the front of the car, but will also lower the front roll centre, which will make the steering less responsive.
    Minimising the front-rear ride height difference will also help to reduce drag.

    RideHeightRearLeft
    RideHeightRearRight

    Changes the height above ground of the lowest point of the car between the rear wheels. Making adjustments here can affect aerodynamics, weight distribution and suspension behaviour. In modern classes a minimum ride height is often stipulated by Balance Of Performance.

    In cars with flat floors, underbody tunnels and diffusers the rear ride height can be used to tune aerodynamic balance. Too high or low and the downforce levels can be drastically reduced. Minimising the front-rear ride height difference will also help to reduce drag.
    Lowering the rear ride height will also help to move the weight distribution towards the rear of the car, but will also lower the rear roll centre. This can introduce more body roll to the rear of the car and stop the rear tyres from being used effectively.

    CamberFrontLeft
    CamberFrontRight
    CamberRearLeft
    CamberRearRight

    Camber defines where the top of the tyre is pointing relative to the bottom when viewed from the front or behind. When this value is negative, the tops of the tyres are pointing inwards, towards the centre of the car. Camber is used to compensate for body roll during cornering, and to make use of camber thrust, which is an increase of lateral grip due to a slightly tilted corner. The trade off is an increase of tyre heat, wear, and it can hurt grip during acceleration and braking.
    Using the tyre info section at the bottom left side of the setup screen is helpful here. When increasing negative camber the inside tyre temperatures will rise and the outside temperatures will fall. Aim for the inside temperatures to be between 5 and 10 degrees hotter than the outside temperatures in order to make optimal use of the tyres.


    BumpFrontLeft
    BumpFrontRight
    BumpRearLeft
    BumpRearRight

    Dampers control how quickly the suspension is able to move and is used to optimise the tyre contact with the road surface. Also known as compression damping, this setting refers to low speed damping, which is used to tune body movement in pitch, roll and heave. It affects transient conditions, such as when entering a corner. Bump damping refers to when the wheels are moving up in the wheel arch, for example the front wheels during heavy braking.
    Increasing this value will increase the responsiveness of the car and enable it to change direction more quickly, but too much or too little will reduce mechanical grip and can result in a car which is unpredictable.
    It’s advisable to increase both bump and rebound when spring rates are increased, and vice versa. This can also be increased or decreased to manage tyre temperatures.

    ReboundFrontLeft
    ReboundFrontRight
    ReboundRearLeft
    ReboundRearRight

    Dampers control how quickly the suspension is able to move and is used to optimise the tyre contact with the road surface. Also known as droop damping, this setting refers to low speed damping, which is used to tune body movement in pitch, roll and heave. It affects transient conditions, such as when entering a corner. Rebound damping refers to when the wheels are dropping down in the wheel arch, for example the rear wheels during heavy braking.
    Too much or too little rebound can make the tyres lose contact with the road surface and can result in lock-ups, snappy turn-in, or poor traction.
    It’s advisable to increase both bump and rebound when spring rates are increased, and vice versa. This can also be increased or decreased to manage tyre temperatures. If a car is unstable over crests, try reducing rebound.

    FastBumpFrontLeft
    FastBumpFrontRight
    FastBumpRearLeft
    FastBumpRearRight

    Fast, or high-speed damping controls the suspension travel over uneven surfaces such as curbs. This setting controls how quickly the wheel is allowed to travel upwards upon contacting a bump.
    If this value is set too high, bumps will not be absorbed sufficiently, and the car will jolt upwards and become unstable over curbs. If set too low, the car may also become unstable, and the suspension will quickly use up it’s available travel over simultaneous bumps, known as jacking-down.


    FastReboundFrontLeft
    FastReboundFrontRight
    FastReboundRearLeft
    FastReboundRearRight

    Fast, or high-speed damping controls the suspension travel over uneven surfaces such as curbs. This setting controls how quickly the wheel is allowed to return downwards after negotiating a bump.
    If this value is set too high, the suspension will not be able to return to its natural position quickly enough and may therefore run out of travel, known as jacking-down. If set too low, the car will oscillate over uneven surfaces.

    SpringsFrontThird
    Also known as heave springs, these are used almost exclusively by high-end prototypes and single seaters. They add an extra vertical resistance to loads and are used to control ride height in high-downforce race cars in order to make optimal use of their aerodynamics. Third springs allow for softer normal springs to be used on each corner and can be used to change the rake angle of the car at speed in order to reduce drag.
    Increase spring rate if the car is running too low or bottoming out at high speed, or if the nose of the car is scraping the ground during heavy braking.
    Reduce spring rate if the car is sitting too high off the ground at high speed.

    SpringsRearThird
    Also known as heave springs, these are used almost exclusively by high-end prototypes and single seaters. They add an extra vertical resistance to loads and are used to control ride height in high-downforce race cars in order to make optimal use of their aerodynamics. Third springs allow for softer normal springs to be used on each corner and can be used to change the rake angle of the car at speed in order to reduce drag.
    Increase spring rate if the car is running too low or bottoming out at high speed, or if the rear of the car is scraping the ground during hard acceleration.
    Reduce spring rate if the car is sitting too high off the ground at high speed.

    BumpFrontThird
    BumpRearThird

    How quickly the third spring is allowed to compress when activated. Used for fine adjustment of the car’s ride height behaviour during accelerating, braking and while under high aerodynamic loads.
    If this value is too high, the main road springs will instead be compressed, which may result in the car scraping the ground. If set too low, the car will oscillate over uneven surfaces or at high speed, known as pourposing.

    ReboundFrontThird
    ReboundRearThird

    How quickly the third spring is allowed to return back after being compressed. Used for fine adjustment of the car’s ride height behaviour during accelerating, braking and while under high aerodynamic loads.
    If this value is set too high, the suspension will not be able to return to its natural position quickly enough and may therefore run out of travel, known as jacking-down. If set too low, the car will oscillate over uneven surfaces or at high speed, known as pourposing.

    FastBumpFrontThird
    FastBumpRearThird

    Controls how quickly the third spring is allowed to move over bumps which affect both front or both rear wheels together.
    If this value is set too high, bumps will not be absorbed sufficiently, and the car will jolt upwards and become unstable over bumps. If set too low, the car may also become unstable, and the suspension will quickly use up it’s available travel over simultaneous bumps, known as jacking-down.


    FastReboundFrontThird
    FastReboundRearThird

    Controls how quickly the third spring is allowed to return after moving over bumps which affect both front or both rear wheels together.
    If this value is set too high, the suspension will not be able to return to its natural position quickly enough and may therefore run out of travel, known as jacking-down. If set too low, the car will oscillate over uneven surfaces.

    WingAngle
    Increasing the value here will add both downforce and drag to the rear of the vehicle. It is normal for a majority of a car’s downforce to be balanced towards the rear of the car and to use the front downforce devices to trim the balance.

    TcPreset1
    TcPreset2
    TcPreset3
    TcPreset4
    TcPreset5
    TcPreset6

    Traction control cuts engine ignition temporarily in order to reduce engine power and stop driven wheels from spinning.
    Each setting defines the maximum throttle cut, in percent, allowed for that setting.

    RevLimit
    Absolute upper limit for engine revs, usually stipulated by balance of performance. May be decreased to improve reliability and fuel use. Sometimes it may be adjusted to allow optimal use of the engine’s torque curve.

    1stGear
    2ndGear
    3rdGear
    4thGear
    5thGear
    6thGear
    7thGear

    After leaving the engine, torque arrives at the gearbox, which is designed with gears to make optimal use of the engine’s torque curve. The idea is to keep engine revs as close to optimal power as possible at all times when accelerating.
    A higher ratio will allow for faster acceleration in that gear, but will limit top speed. A lower ratio will have the opposite effect.
    NB: Most modern race series require homologated gear ratios which are not permitted to change.

    FinalGear
    The final bit of gearing between the transmission and the driven wheels, which usually consists of a crownwheel and pinion inside the differential.
    A higher final drive ratio will supply more torque to the rear wheels, but will limit top speed.
    A lower final drive ratio will allow for a higher top speed.
    NB: Most modern race series require a homologated final drive ratio which is not adjustable.

    DifferentialPower
    A limited-slip race car differential is comprised of clutch plates which are pushed together under different conditions in order to lock the wheels together and provide optimal traction.
    This setting changes how much of the locking force of the differential is applied during acceleration. Too much locking here can make the car understeer out of turns and snappy.
    Increase this value if the car spins the inside wheel coming out of turns.

    DifferentialCoast
    A limited-slip race car differential is comprised of clutch plates which are pushed together under different conditions in order to lock the wheels together and provide optimal traction.
    This setting changes how much of the locking force of the differential is applied when coasting.
    Increase if the car is unstable when off the power, decrease if the car is hard to turn, especially while negotiating tight corners.

    DifferentialPreload
    How much torque difference between the left and right driven wheels needs to be met until a wheel speed difference is allowed. until then the axle is locked solid. This setting effectively increases the amount of locking the differential has throughout its operating range.

    Increase if the car is unstable into and out of turns and spins the inside driven wheel when exiting corners.
    Reduce if the car is hard to turn in and is snappy when it’s wheels are spinning.
     
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    Last edited: Dec 12, 2019
  3. Mike S

    Mike S Member

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    Really cool.

    any chance we’ll see realistic TC and ABS settings? For example I think the Porsche gt3 car has 12 steps in TC in real life and the ABS has 8.

    Any plans to sync up with the real life car settings?

    Similarly, we will be able to turn off the ABS?
     
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  4. Koly™

    Koly™ Active Member

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    the PORSCHE GT3 R 2019 with my settings is very very close to ACC feeling....and with the FFB options, I can adapt to my preference, contrary to rF2, or ACC FFB....

    Congratz, I hope you can upgrade the cars like AUDI TT CUP, they have the old floating feeling... so much updates that I need more time to test everything
     
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  5. Alex Hodgkinson

    Alex Hodgkinson Sector3 Developer

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    @Mike S Yes definitely plans to do that.

    You can already turn off ABS in the garage screen. You have the option of Factory - on, on, or off
     
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  6. Koly™

    Koly™ Active Member

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    "Global AI behavioral improvements, with car specific tweaks using a self-learning algorithm."

    do I need the adaptive mode ? Or can i race like I was racing, AI at 100%.....what time do the AI need to be better ?
     
  7. ElNino

    ElNino Well-Known Member

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    This is very exciting indeed to see these improvements seeing the light of day. Sounds like these improvements were taken as seriously as a heart attack! Kudos to the R3E team.
     
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  8. CrimsonEminence

    CrimsonEminence Member

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    This is working the opposite way, just tested it.

    If you lower the value, the steering gets less sensitive, if you increase it, it gets more sensitive.
     
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  9. 2ndLastJedi

    2ndLastJedi Well-Known Member

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    Awesome reading and will be even better when I can fire up my PC!
    Thanks team.... Also, I can now knock off a mirror? That's so cool :)
    I realize there is more to be excited about but I don't think I've seen that in a Sim yet!
     
  10. CrimsonEminence

    CrimsonEminence Member

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    I was not encountering much visual damage yet even with contact to other cars...but your suspension can get some hit, by misusing Kerbs, this happened to me.^^
     
  11. MattYKee

    MattYKee Member

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    Early impressions of this change are the most impressive. Previously camber in raceroom aswell as every other sim i played was highly exploitative and innaccurate to the point it was outright cheating. imho.
     
  12. Rella

    Rella Well-Known Member

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    First of all thanks a lot for the great work and insights. Any chance to let us know which settings you used on the wheel? Out of the box or the recommended settings from the Fanatec forum or maybe sth different? The question mainly points towards overall strength, natural damper and friction. Thanks
     
  13. 2ndLastJedi

    2ndLastJedi Well-Known Member

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    Quick test on 92 DTM Merc (used new FFB preset for CSWv2) and it is amazing ! Totally blown away with how it feels .
    Damage seems good also .
     
  14. Rodger Davies

    Rodger Davies Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the post, really intrigued to try the AI improvement - you already had the best around but if you've solved the 'slow in tight corners, fast on fast corners' issues and made them drive more like the player then a thousand thanks. I just hope they can still navigate traffic as well as before.
     
  15. Женя

    Женя New Member

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    Thank you so much for your work! As a fan of this game we have been waiting for this for many years :)) I am very happy to spend time in this game. it became much better to feel cars, demolitions, and now it has become much clear what is happening with the car.:)
     
  16. bearr

    bearr Active Member

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    This does not work. When you exit the garage, the settings are reset. When you try to save, it also sets the default level. So it should be?
     
  17. Nico Kunze

    Nico Kunze Well-Known Member

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    So when i load up a leaderboard session to check the ideal tire temps for a certain car will inside middle and outside all have the same temp or will the inside be warmer? Should i then (in a normal session) aim for my inside temp to get as close to the number thats shown?
     
  18. Esa Ahonen

    Esa Ahonen Member

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    Ratings:
    +10 / 0 / -0
    I'm sad to say but I don't like the way the physics are going. To me that horrible vibration doesn't feel like car understeering, the old physics had it better. I also wonder why does the wheel (G25) slightly vibrate in straight line (engine vibrations are at 0%). Also the newer cars feel very floaty. It's like there's a pillow under the car and it rotates on that first before actually doing what it's told. That suits some classes but I believe that eg. Formula 90's should be more planted.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  19. Balrog

    Balrog Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2015
    Ratings:
    +288 / 0 / -0
    I for one am very happy with the direction. The new physics feel much more natural in general.
     
    • Agree Agree x 8
    • Like Like x 1
  20. Roman TRT

    Roman TRT Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2015
    Ratings:
    +67 / 0 / -0
    tell me, when changing the time of day 0 and at x1, will the grip on the track change?
    It’s a pity that the setting is the acceleration of the time of day for the entire session, and not separately for each session.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2019